What We’re Reading

Cherries for Jam

Cherries for jam

We met on Twitter, interest piqued by each other’s profiles, and conversed about our shared passions and interests in 140 characters or less. We eventually did brunch to determine if virtual admiration would lead to in-person friendship. It did, and we continue to meet regularly over coffee and something sweet.

Jodi is a professional editor; Deborah is a chef. We both like to write for public consumption, and we both read — a lot. We find the term “blogger” ill fitting (the search is on for a bespoke identifier) and agree that there is an abundance of good food storytelling online — via narrative, recipes, and images — crafted by passionate amateurs like us. We’re publishing our favourite finds on the 1st and 15th of each month.

Subscribe to either of our feeds to get our updates, and join in the hunt — leave a comment to tell us about your food-writing discoveries.

Reading

“It’s your movie, don’t be in someone else’s . . . (My husband’s favourite piece of advice to the children.)” Fiona Beckett determines what makes a good food blog.

“I think about my own life—split between country and city—and know that this is part of the legacy my grandfather left me: hard work, a thirst for knowledge, but a grounding in dirt.”

“I remember what summer was like back then. I remember the important things.” Including the commingling of salty-sweet-sour, frozen to take the edge of the season’s heat.”

Emily Horton was set in her fig-thieving ways. Until a chance encounter reformed her practice and ushered in the bountiful generosity of neighbours.

Shayma writes about food for the rainy season (which we’re not used to in Toronto but are learning the ropes quickly this year): “Just before the deluge of the monsoons, the sky in Lahore turns a steel grey and everyone in the house scurries about closing windows in every room and the doors leading to the garden. Our cook, Riaz, knows that the rains are a cue for getting out the chickpea flour to whip up some spicy vegetarian fritters…”

Recipes

Brownies of Gratitude. *swoon*

“We ate, sucking juices as we bit, nearly half the flat of peaches on the way home. Probably would have ate it all if it weren’t for the apricots in all their deliciousness.

Hurry up and ripen, peaches!

Waiting for Montmorencies to hit the market for making Russian sour-cherry preserves.

A novel way to eat okra.

Photos

“This piece acts as a metaphor for the economic imbalance in many of the sugar producing countries, such as Brazil and the sugar industry as a whole. Beneath the surface of the sugar industry empire lies the reality of its slave labor foundation.”

We love ice cream (and thank the Art of Eating for bringing this to our attention).

Katie’s photos of the Barossa Valley in France. Stunning.

Shades of garnet and ruby. Raspberries are jewels, indeed.

Nineteenth-century pie. Toto, we’re not in Kansas, anymore…

Video

Slow-cooked Italian fast food. Life needs more Sara Jenkins!

 

1 response to What We’re Reading

  1. Jodi – thank you for the honourable mention. I am such a fan of your lyrical writing – naturally, I feel humbled to see my name here. x s

    ~ s  |  July 15th, 2013 at 7:37 am

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